Lenovo thinkpad x carbon i7

lenovo thinkpad x carbon i7

The X1 Carbon was first released in China due to the popularity of ThinkPads in that market. In November , Lenovo announced a touch-screen. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 9 - 14" - Core i7 G7 - Evo - 16 GB RAM - GB SSD - US ; Processor / Chipset: Intel Core i7 (11th Gen) G7 / GHz. LENOVO ThinkPad X1 Carbon (i / 8GB / GB). $3, $1, Specifications: • Intel(R) Core(TM) iU CPU @ GHz • 8GB RAM • GB SSD. CANON 1D MARK 2N Time interval is used relied upon or window. The issue frames are Ctrl and period of than anything mode to the software. Spotify also settings should. It usually Grants privileges costing them timeless casual all the.

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It would have been nice to have a more even distribution from the nits range. At the end of the day, this panel is just awesome. Note that this panel is capable of being used for color-sensitive work, but it was not calibrated out of the box. The screen is bright enough for most normal situations, yet not near as bright as the 4k panel.

The contrast is still just great. Notice how this screen compares well to panels on most other laptops. The FHD panel also has some abrupt brightness levels, and probably too many low brightness options. Lenovo is definitely doing something different other than the default brightness settings, as they advertise a panel brightness of nits, while I only got nits. For most productivity applications, this is more than enough horsepower to get the job done.

I took some benchmarks to validate how good the drive is, and it proved fast, especially with the write speeds. There will be very little reason to upgrade unless you just want a bigger drive. Speaking of upgrading — if you do decide to do so, this laptop is pretty easy to open up. With a regular Phillips screwdriver, I was able to remove 5 screws which are locked onto the cover and the cover popped right off. The 80mm M. I installed a number of different programs and all of them ran very well.

I did notice a little lag in some of the scrolling on some programs though, which might be due to the trackpad or the fact that this is a 4k screen. I put the laptop into performance mode and here were my results:. Besides the screen and CPU, it has the same specs.

This unit has an iU processor. Some of these benchmarks are better than the version with the iU and others are a little worse. Throttling is definitely a factor in both units, so the results might be a little unreliable. Regardless, they both appear to function the same from a practical use.

The cooling system on the X1 Carbon is a mixed bag for me. Thing is, while in performance mode, the CPU spikes temps in the high 90s pretty regularly. Doing simple things like opening a browser could even cause these spikes and temperatures level out in the high 80s as a result. After further testing, I noticed that the CPU would hit 99C on all 4 cores during my benchmark testing.

I did try to do some fixing by undervolting the CPU, but I was only able to achieve a mV undervolt and it had little effect on my results. Only by limiting the cores to Mhz was I able to keep the CPU from hitting thermal throttling limits. Not good…. The interesting thing though is that even if it clocks down, the laptop still performs pretty well. This does come with vPro though, which might be an important factor for some of you in the corporate environments.

Doing that alone limits the TDP and easily drops temps by up to 20C, but by consequence you lose a little performance. Under normal loads, I barely heard the fan operate. When under light loads, the fans kicked on and I measured 30dB in a room with ambient noise levels being 28dB.

Under intense loads, the fans would ramp up to about 38dB at ear level and 50dB measured right at the exhaust. I also took some thermal readings on the outside of the casing, top and bottom, while under normal loads and also while gaming. The heat buildup seems to favor the right side of the laptop. I also find it strange that the top of the laptop gets hotter than the bottom, in some spots.

Yes, it gets hot, but note that this is only in Best Performance mode. Turning the settings down certainly helps things. My internet connection measured about Mbps pretty much anywhere in my house. No complaints in this department at all. Aside from the tweeters being completely new, Lenovo also replaced the bottom speakers with larger and more powerful ones.

As a result, they are actually pretty punchy, with full sound, both highs and lows. I actually detected bass as low as 45Hz. The max volume on these speakers topped out at 75dB which is pretty good. I will say that the feature worked very well, day or night. The webcam by itself is pretty decent. Well-lit shots looked much better. Lenovo also added an improved set of four near-field microphones on the iteration, which should further help in calls.

A fingerprint scanner is offered in addition to the Windows Hello cam, which is located to the right of the trackpad. This worked flawlessly for me every time. Lenovo did things right by adding both biometrics, as some may work better for certain people. Considering the 4k screen, these results are alright. For most activities, you can get several hours out of the machine. However, if you need longer runtimes, you might want to consider a model with a low power FHD screen instead.

I repeated most of these tests with my FHD model and this is what I got. Both units come with a watt charger with quick charging. There are many different models of the 7 th generation Thinkpad x1 Carbon. Both of these models are available on Amazon. It really has it where it counts. Portability and low weight aside, the Carbon X1 deserves high praise on its input devices.

The keyboard was an absolute joy to type on and the trackpad and biometrics made all my day to day activities very easy. If this was my daily driver, I would not be disappointed at all. I wish I had an i5 model to test, but my hunch is it probably performs similarly to the i7s.

At the end of the day, I still recommend this laptop to anyone that wants one of the thinnest and lightest ultraportables on the market. That wraps up my opinions on this ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th gen. I hope you found it informative. In most of the daily use, it is totally unuseful and, without it, the CPU energy consumption and heating is a lot lower.

You can probably squeeze much better performances overall because of the higher frequency every single core can achieve. I'm really surprised nobody really test CPUs in this configuration. Derek Sullivan. I just ran cinebench r20 with hyperthreading disabled. Single core stayed about the same at points which makes sense since that test only uses one thread.

The multicore score dropped from to though. And all 4 cores still hit 99C and throttled. Makes some sense, but depends on the real use. Does CineBench r20 takes in consideration this kind of environment? But when this happens in real use? The chance of throttling on all cores should be reduced with hyperthreading disabled when you try to overclock a CPU, you can usually hit higher frequencies with HT disabled just because it stays a little cooler, and what you gain in frequency is worth the loss of HT to increase single core performances.

This is true on games for example. Btw it is a nice laptop! Andrei Girbea. It would depend on the workload. If it's something that balances well over 8 threads, you won't get better performance this way. The CPU normally does a pretty good job adjusting its speed within the thermal and Power-limit constraints.

Undervolting is something I recommend, but otherwise I'd leave things on auto. Are you actually testing the battery life, or are you calculating using the watt numbers you get? Hi, Thanks for the well written review. I'm going to order the i5 version with 16GB memory which I read in another review would probably perform close to the same as the i7 in many cases due to the i7 throttling to keep heat down.

Plus, for my usage I do not think I need an i7. If I was doing any tacks that needed processor power I would use my desktop. I have a question on the FHD, I'm trying to decide on that screen nits for the brightness and better battery life or the WQHD for a sharper picture maybe more color accurate? What I wondered was during your testing did you notice any excessive ghosting which can be present with low power screens, or did you find the ghosting to be minimal?

Hi Kirk. I didn't notice any ghosting. I think the fhd screen is fine, especially at 14". I haven't seen the qhd, but I'd take the fhd for the power savings and the added brightness. This is odd as another article clearly states that nits low power display from Lenovo develops terrible ghosting.

NBC has equipment to measure the actual response time, so those numbers are pretty legit. It's not an ideal response time, but I didn't notice it during my use. Then again, I wasn't gaming on this laptop either, so it's no surprise I couldn't tell. It's not an easy thing to notice unless you're particularly sensitive to it or are playing games that require a fast time.

On the Lenovo. Folks who have experimented with struggling to hear ANY sound whatsoever coming from those speakers came up empty! Zero sounds coming out from those speakers. One guy who found a youtube video which is a Dolby demo video said on THAT one specific video, he was able to hear a little bit of sound coming from those speakers. Besides that, none whatsoever. Others concurred.

May I please ask if you might be able to discuss this lack of any audio from the new speakers upward facing north of the keyboard issue please? At first I thought the same thing. In fact, in my first draft it was actually a complaint because I had no idea what the holes were for. Once I figured out they were tweeters, I spent a lot more time and figured out that they only play very high frequency sounds. And it's definitely not as loud.

This might be by design, but I'm not sure. The speakers as a whole sounded good so I didn't mind that they aren't as loud as the bottom. I'd rather have full, clear sound than something that's pushed too far and sounds crackly. I've definitely seen my fair share of failures for quad speakers on laptops. As a long time audiophile, and as someone who just cancelled my X1C7 order my arrival date is for Oct 16th though i ordered on Aug 1st!!

One good test would be to choose a piece of music that we know has a lot of cymbals, triangles, and such high pitched percussive instruments. These high frequencies of "ding ding ding…" and such would most likely emanate from the top facing speakers. May I please request that if possible, that you kindly please perform such a test, please? Thank you Derek in advance. This is a pretty standard approach used by various speaker designers and it gets applied in many guises.

Essentially low frequency bass sounds take more power to create at a volume that we can hear, so techniques are used to increase the efficiency. These include letting the sounds fire towards a hard surface as in this case, or putting a box with an open tube on one side to impedance match with the air. These efficiency improvements can come at a cost, and this can include a poor group delay response 'ringing on' or uneven frequency response. Thankfully, our ears aren't too sensitive to this for bass sounds, so designers can get away with it.

For high frequency treble sounds this isn't the case — in most scenarios you want the speakers facing you, since the ear is most sensitive to imperfections in this frequency range. Could you compare this to the Lenovo S 14"? The u version has been a solid all-rounder for me but with lots of little things that could be improved. I can't unfortunately because I've never actually had a S in my hand. In general though, Ideapads are less robust than the Thinkpad lineup and are maid more for the mainstream crowd.

Hence the cost difference. If you're super careful with your machines, an Ideapad can last a very long time. But it will definitely show it's age with typical use. Regardless, the X1 Carbon provides a very high quality and delights with a mechanical, crisp typing experience, which you will hardly find in any competitor.

At the same time, the grippy surface of the slightly concave letters size: 16 x 16 mm makes for an excellent feedback and a high hit rate. In dark environments, the keys can be lit by a white LED backlight with two levels.

The touchpad from Synaptics also has been especially designed for the X1 Carbon. The surface is a 10 x 5. In terms of haptic and quality experience it easily outperforms the Ts. Apart from flawless precision, we liked the extremely smooth implementation of the multi-touch gestures, which only Apple devices delivered for a long time.

The pre-installed driver panel allows adapting all properties of the touchpad. Hardly any other notebook offers that many configuration options. In order to trigger a click, the user only needs to slightly tap the touchpad or press in about 1 to 2 mm from the front edge Clickpad design.

Those who prefer a crisp, hard pressure point to a quite soft stroke, can use the trackpoint buttons above the touchpad. As usual, the small read joystick sits between the G, H, and B keys and can be used as likewise precises yet not that versatile alternative to the touchpad. However, the data sheet does not list a touchscreen option - such will not be available for the fourth generation of the Carbon for now.

Unfortunately, we have to criticize Lenovo once again for not meeting all promised specifications. However, we could subjectively not detect limitations in practice. Therewith we have already discussed all the negative aspects. The panel performs good to very good in all other aspects. For example, there are the high contrast ratio of , which even exceeds the specified by the manufacturer. Although several devices including the Dell Latitude E perform even better, the X1 Carbon scores points with strong, saturated images, which is especially a benefit for videos and photos.

The colors also convince with above average precision of colors DeltaE of 2. After calibration, the DeltaE shift even falls to impressive 1. However, you should stick to the almost fully covered sRGB color space Especially under direct sunlight, it is difficult to read from the screen despite anti-reflective surface.

Those who turn the ThinkPad away from the light source or work in the shade, should be able to get along well. Outdoor sunshine. There should be no flickering or PWM above this brightness setting. The frequency of Hz is relatively low, so sensitive users will likely notice flickering and experience eyestrain at the stated brightness setting and below. If PWM was detected, an average of minimum: 5 - maximum: Hz was measured. Typical for IPS displays, the viewing angles are very wide.

Even at extreme viewing angles, we could only observe a slight brightness and contrast decrease, yet not extreme color or gamma shifts as in a cheap TN panel. As a result, the user does not need to permanently adapt the opening angle depending on the sitting position.

Furthermore, several users can look at the display at the same time. In the refreshed X1 Carbon the Broadwell processors of the predecessor have been replaced by Intel's newer Skylake processors, which promise higher performance and longer battery runtimes at the same TDP of 15 Watt.

You can select between several models from the Core iU 2. Our test model comes with a Core iU dual core processor with Hyperthreading clocked at up to 2. Attention: Other than the iU or iU, the iU does not support vPro - in case this is required in your company. As expected, the ThinkPad does not use dedicated graphics solutions, but the integrated HD Graphics However, it shines with many modern features like DirectX 12 or hardware accelerated H.

All models use M. Our test model comes with a GB model. As a result, several models cannot fully use their Turbo Boost potential under high load. Thus, Lenovo has increased the TDP from 15 to 25 Watt in the Ts , which was not possible in the even slimmer X1 Carbon probably due to thermal reasons.

If only a single core is used, this does not have an impact and the iU clocks constantly at the maximum of 3. This changes as soon as a program uses all cores or threads, respectively: Initially, the clock rate is 3. Thus, the higher price for fast i7 models only pay off to some extent. Price-conscious buyers should better choose a Core iU or iU.

We could not detect performance differences in mains operation and on battery during our test. This is a decent result, although the PM predecessor was only insignificantly slower overall. The results in the 4K and 4K tests are good, too. Lenovo might probably use the same drives as in the Ts sibling here. In the PCMark 8, the X1 Carbon can directly turn the higher CPU performance into a higher score and performs significantly better than the previous year's model.

Finally, this confirms our subjective impressions: A current Core i5 and a mid-priced SSD are sufficient for an office and multimedia device, even if the user has many PDF documents, browser tabs and Excel spreadsheet open at the same time. Those who work with demanding simulation or rendering software should better choose a fully fledged quad core bolide like the Tp anyway.

It is interesting that the slightly smaller bandwidth than the DDR4 interface's in our devices does apparently not have the slightest impact on performance. In the 3DMark Fire Strike test, our test model even achieved the highest score we have measured for a HD so far.

The HD Graphics performs flawlessly when it comes to efficient playback of high resolution videos. However, most of years old games run smoothly, albeit with low settings and x or x resolution. However, users can try casual gaming including Diablo 3, World of Warcraft or Counter-Strike: Global Offensive if they can accept lower image quality and medium frame rates. Thanks to an SSD and almost always still standing fan, the X1 Carbon is not only silent while idle, but also during simple everyday tasks.

However, the fan starts running notably quicker than the bigger ThinkPad Ts 's under medium load, which is undoubtedly due to the even thinner case. Since you can already hardly hear the fan in a few centimeters distance, this is not disturbing in practice. When the demand on processor and graphics chip is higher, the noise level climbs to between 36 3DMark06 and 38 dB A stress test.

Together with the subjectively pleasant und uniform frequency characteristics, it is not annoying in the long run. The temperature management of Lenovo's business notebooks is surprisingly good while idle as well as under load. Even during the stress test, the temperature only exceeds 40 C in two spots.

Otherwise, the ThinkPad does not even get lukewarm. Thus, it is possible to use the laptop on the lap without limitations. The core temperature of the Core i7 remains uncritical at 70 to 75 C, even when Prime95 and FurMark are running simultaneously. That processor and graphics core still only clock at and MHz, respectively, is caused by reaching the TDP limit of 15 Watt. Thanks to a limit of 25 Watt, the Ts can keep significantly higher frequencies.

With a maximum volume of about 80 dB A , the down-faced stereo speakers of the X1 Carbon are conveniently loud, but do not sound convincing. The frequency characteristic already falls much at below Hz. The mid-heavy sound ensures good speech quality, but is not advantageous for videos and music. The latter provides a clear and sufficiently loud audio signal through most headphones. The power consumption is not surprising: With 3. The Full HD models might be even more frugal.

A 52 Wh battery integrated in the case provides energy on the move. According to Lenovo, it lasts up to 11 hours. Under optimal conditions, even almost 16 hours are possible according to our measurements: sitting idle on the desktop at minimum brightness laptop and with disabled radio modules. We cannot explain the unexpectedly high difference to the Ts sibling with insignificantly smaller battery in another way. Together with the included 65 Watt power adapter, the ThinkPad X1 supports a so-called "RapidCharge" mode, which allows charging the battery from 0 to 80 percent within an hour.

If the notebook is used at the same time, this takes about 10 to 15 minutes longer. We do not want to judge here whether this is really necessary or reasonable - but help to find the best device for each purpose. With an aggressive weight of not even 1. Despite slim design, the user hardly needs bother about limitations in performance, connectivity, or emissions. On top of that, Lenovo has incorporated a very attractive WQHD panel with great colors and contrasts, which could have, at best, been a bit brighter.

However, there are good reasons to prefer the Ts over the X1 Carbon. In return for its slightly bigger case, you'll get an even crispier keyboard, additional upgrade and connectivity options native LAN port, SmartCard, SD reader as well as higher performance reserves thank to an increased TDP.

In addition, the price of the Ts is more attractive, yet still very high. All things considered, we would tend to recommend the T series - however, this decision might vary depending on the user. Already the third generation of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon belonged to the slimmest and lightest 14 inch notebooks on the market. In the fourth generation, Lenovo goes one better and reduces the weight to below 1.

We have checked how this affects temperatures, system noise, and performance. Intel Core iU 2 x 2. Lenovo homepage Lenovo notebook section. Note: The manufacturer may use components from different suppliers including display panels, drives or memory sticks with similar specifications. Size comparison Security Except for the Smartcard reader, the X1 Carbon provides all security features you might expect from a modern business notebook including an extremely fast fingerprint reader mit touch sensor, TPM TCG 1.

Warranty Lenovo grants a 3 years warranty with on-site service for its higher priced models - which certainly also include the X1 Carbon - from purchase. Input Devices. Keyboard Although they look almost the same, the keyboard of the ThinkPad X1 is not exactly the same than the Ts '. Touchpad The touchpad from Synaptics also has been especially designed for the X1 Carbon. Touchpad and trackpoint. Subpixel grid.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th Gen Review (2019)

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You can also use single taps and double finger taps for left and right-click as well. There are also three physical buttons, all of which are above the trackpad. This is a little unusual, but it makes sense because they are intended to be used with TrackPoint and not with the trackpad. If you are a button user though, it is possible to get used to using it with the trackpad as well. The middle button is programmable as a middle mouse button opening links in new tab or for Trackpoint scrolling.

The Trackpoint itself was a blast from the past for me. I used this exclusively when I had my old ThinkPad, but quickly adapted to trackpads later on, as I found them easier to use. All my touch gestures register just fine and tracking the mouse pointer is smooth and accurate.

My only gripe is with the fact that two-finger scrolling could be a little smoother. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the trackpad is Elan on my sample, and not Synaptics. They are all inch IPS panels, but of various quality. The max brightness I was able to achieve was nits, which is phenomenal, and comes close to the nits brightness advertised by Lenovo!

The contrast ratio was also excellent, topping out at As you can see, the brightness distribution is pretty good. But one thing to note is the brightness levels across Windows settings. This laptop covers both needs. The only gripe I have is the lack of mid-range brightness levels though. It would have been nice to have a more even distribution from the nits range.

At the end of the day, this panel is just awesome. Note that this panel is capable of being used for color-sensitive work, but it was not calibrated out of the box. The screen is bright enough for most normal situations, yet not near as bright as the 4k panel. The contrast is still just great. Notice how this screen compares well to panels on most other laptops.

The FHD panel also has some abrupt brightness levels, and probably too many low brightness options. Lenovo is definitely doing something different other than the default brightness settings, as they advertise a panel brightness of nits, while I only got nits. For most productivity applications, this is more than enough horsepower to get the job done. I took some benchmarks to validate how good the drive is, and it proved fast, especially with the write speeds.

There will be very little reason to upgrade unless you just want a bigger drive. Speaking of upgrading — if you do decide to do so, this laptop is pretty easy to open up. With a regular Phillips screwdriver, I was able to remove 5 screws which are locked onto the cover and the cover popped right off.

The 80mm M. I installed a number of different programs and all of them ran very well. I did notice a little lag in some of the scrolling on some programs though, which might be due to the trackpad or the fact that this is a 4k screen. I put the laptop into performance mode and here were my results:. Besides the screen and CPU, it has the same specs. This unit has an iU processor. Some of these benchmarks are better than the version with the iU and others are a little worse.

Throttling is definitely a factor in both units, so the results might be a little unreliable. Regardless, they both appear to function the same from a practical use. The cooling system on the X1 Carbon is a mixed bag for me. Thing is, while in performance mode, the CPU spikes temps in the high 90s pretty regularly. Doing simple things like opening a browser could even cause these spikes and temperatures level out in the high 80s as a result.

After further testing, I noticed that the CPU would hit 99C on all 4 cores during my benchmark testing. I did try to do some fixing by undervolting the CPU, but I was only able to achieve a mV undervolt and it had little effect on my results. Only by limiting the cores to Mhz was I able to keep the CPU from hitting thermal throttling limits.

Not good…. The interesting thing though is that even if it clocks down, the laptop still performs pretty well. This does come with vPro though, which might be an important factor for some of you in the corporate environments. Doing that alone limits the TDP and easily drops temps by up to 20C, but by consequence you lose a little performance. Under normal loads, I barely heard the fan operate.

When under light loads, the fans kicked on and I measured 30dB in a room with ambient noise levels being 28dB. Under intense loads, the fans would ramp up to about 38dB at ear level and 50dB measured right at the exhaust. I also took some thermal readings on the outside of the casing, top and bottom, while under normal loads and also while gaming.

The heat buildup seems to favor the right side of the laptop. I also find it strange that the top of the laptop gets hotter than the bottom, in some spots. Yes, it gets hot, but note that this is only in Best Performance mode. Turning the settings down certainly helps things. My internet connection measured about Mbps pretty much anywhere in my house.

No complaints in this department at all. Aside from the tweeters being completely new, Lenovo also replaced the bottom speakers with larger and more powerful ones. As a result, they are actually pretty punchy, with full sound, both highs and lows.

I actually detected bass as low as 45Hz. The max volume on these speakers topped out at 75dB which is pretty good. I will say that the feature worked very well, day or night. The webcam by itself is pretty decent. Well-lit shots looked much better. Lenovo also added an improved set of four near-field microphones on the iteration, which should further help in calls.

A fingerprint scanner is offered in addition to the Windows Hello cam, which is located to the right of the trackpad. This worked flawlessly for me every time. Lenovo did things right by adding both biometrics, as some may work better for certain people. Considering the 4k screen, these results are alright.

For most activities, you can get several hours out of the machine. However, if you need longer runtimes, you might want to consider a model with a low power FHD screen instead. I repeated most of these tests with my FHD model and this is what I got. Both units come with a watt charger with quick charging. There are many different models of the 7 th generation Thinkpad x1 Carbon.

Both of these models are available on Amazon. It really has it where it counts. Portability and low weight aside, the Carbon X1 deserves high praise on its input devices. The keyboard was an absolute joy to type on and the trackpad and biometrics made all my day to day activities very easy. If this was my daily driver, I would not be disappointed at all. I wish I had an i5 model to test, but my hunch is it probably performs similarly to the i7s.

At the end of the day, I still recommend this laptop to anyone that wants one of the thinnest and lightest ultraportables on the market. That wraps up my opinions on this ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th gen. I hope you found it informative. In most of the daily use, it is totally unuseful and, without it, the CPU energy consumption and heating is a lot lower. You can probably squeeze much better performances overall because of the higher frequency every single core can achieve.

I'm really surprised nobody really test CPUs in this configuration. Derek Sullivan. I just ran cinebench r20 with hyperthreading disabled. Single core stayed about the same at points which makes sense since that test only uses one thread.

The multicore score dropped from to though. And all 4 cores still hit 99C and throttled. Makes some sense, but depends on the real use. Does CineBench r20 takes in consideration this kind of environment? But when this happens in real use? The chance of throttling on all cores should be reduced with hyperthreading disabled when you try to overclock a CPU, you can usually hit higher frequencies with HT disabled just because it stays a little cooler, and what you gain in frequency is worth the loss of HT to increase single core performances.

This is true on games for example. Btw it is a nice laptop! Andrei Girbea. It would depend on the workload. If it's something that balances well over 8 threads, you won't get better performance this way. The CPU normally does a pretty good job adjusting its speed within the thermal and Power-limit constraints.

Undervolting is something I recommend, but otherwise I'd leave things on auto. Are you actually testing the battery life, or are you calculating using the watt numbers you get? Hi, Thanks for the well written review. I'm going to order the i5 version with 16GB memory which I read in another review would probably perform close to the same as the i7 in many cases due to the i7 throttling to keep heat down.

Plus, for my usage I do not think I need an i7. If I was doing any tacks that needed processor power I would use my desktop. I have a question on the FHD, I'm trying to decide on that screen nits for the brightness and better battery life or the WQHD for a sharper picture maybe more color accurate?

What I wondered was during your testing did you notice any excessive ghosting which can be present with low power screens, or did you find the ghosting to be minimal? Hi Kirk. I didn't notice any ghosting. I think the fhd screen is fine, especially at 14". I haven't seen the qhd, but I'd take the fhd for the power savings and the added brightness.

This is odd as another article clearly states that nits low power display from Lenovo develops terrible ghosting. NBC has equipment to measure the actual response time, so those numbers are pretty legit. It's not an ideal response time, but I didn't notice it during my use. Then again, I wasn't gaming on this laptop either, so it's no surprise I couldn't tell.

It's not an easy thing to notice unless you're particularly sensitive to it or are playing games that require a fast time. On the Lenovo. Folks who have experimented with struggling to hear ANY sound whatsoever coming from those speakers came up empty!

Zero sounds coming out from those speakers. One guy who found a youtube video which is a Dolby demo video said on THAT one specific video, he was able to hear a little bit of sound coming from those speakers. Besides that, none whatsoever. Others concurred. May I please ask if you might be able to discuss this lack of any audio from the new speakers upward facing north of the keyboard issue please? At first I thought the same thing.

In fact, in my first draft it was actually a complaint because I had no idea what the holes were for. Once I figured out they were tweeters, I spent a lot more time and figured out that they only play very high frequency sounds. And it's definitely not as loud. This might be by design, but I'm not sure. The speakers as a whole sounded good so I didn't mind that they aren't as loud as the bottom.

I'd rather have full, clear sound than something that's pushed too far and sounds crackly. I've definitely seen my fair share of failures for quad speakers on laptops. As a long time audiophile, and as someone who just cancelled my X1C7 order my arrival date is for Oct 16th though i ordered on Aug 1st!! The results in the 4K and 4K tests are good, too.

Lenovo might probably use the same drives as in the Ts sibling here. In the PCMark 8, the X1 Carbon can directly turn the higher CPU performance into a higher score and performs significantly better than the previous year's model.

Finally, this confirms our subjective impressions: A current Core i5 and a mid-priced SSD are sufficient for an office and multimedia device, even if the user has many PDF documents, browser tabs and Excel spreadsheet open at the same time. Those who work with demanding simulation or rendering software should better choose a fully fledged quad core bolide like the Tp anyway.

It is interesting that the slightly smaller bandwidth than the DDR4 interface's in our devices does apparently not have the slightest impact on performance. In the 3DMark Fire Strike test, our test model even achieved the highest score we have measured for a HD so far. The HD Graphics performs flawlessly when it comes to efficient playback of high resolution videos. However, most of years old games run smoothly, albeit with low settings and x or x resolution.

However, users can try casual gaming including Diablo 3, World of Warcraft or Counter-Strike: Global Offensive if they can accept lower image quality and medium frame rates. Thanks to an SSD and almost always still standing fan, the X1 Carbon is not only silent while idle, but also during simple everyday tasks. However, the fan starts running notably quicker than the bigger ThinkPad Ts 's under medium load, which is undoubtedly due to the even thinner case. Since you can already hardly hear the fan in a few centimeters distance, this is not disturbing in practice.

When the demand on processor and graphics chip is higher, the noise level climbs to between 36 3DMark06 and 38 dB A stress test. Together with the subjectively pleasant und uniform frequency characteristics, it is not annoying in the long run. The temperature management of Lenovo's business notebooks is surprisingly good while idle as well as under load.

Even during the stress test, the temperature only exceeds 40 C in two spots. Otherwise, the ThinkPad does not even get lukewarm. Thus, it is possible to use the laptop on the lap without limitations. The core temperature of the Core i7 remains uncritical at 70 to 75 C, even when Prime95 and FurMark are running simultaneously. That processor and graphics core still only clock at and MHz, respectively, is caused by reaching the TDP limit of 15 Watt. Thanks to a limit of 25 Watt, the Ts can keep significantly higher frequencies.

With a maximum volume of about 80 dB A , the down-faced stereo speakers of the X1 Carbon are conveniently loud, but do not sound convincing. The frequency characteristic already falls much at below Hz. The mid-heavy sound ensures good speech quality, but is not advantageous for videos and music.

The latter provides a clear and sufficiently loud audio signal through most headphones. The power consumption is not surprising: With 3. The Full HD models might be even more frugal. A 52 Wh battery integrated in the case provides energy on the move. According to Lenovo, it lasts up to 11 hours. Under optimal conditions, even almost 16 hours are possible according to our measurements: sitting idle on the desktop at minimum brightness laptop and with disabled radio modules.

We cannot explain the unexpectedly high difference to the Ts sibling with insignificantly smaller battery in another way. Together with the included 65 Watt power adapter, the ThinkPad X1 supports a so-called "RapidCharge" mode, which allows charging the battery from 0 to 80 percent within an hour. If the notebook is used at the same time, this takes about 10 to 15 minutes longer. We do not want to judge here whether this is really necessary or reasonable - but help to find the best device for each purpose.

With an aggressive weight of not even 1. Despite slim design, the user hardly needs bother about limitations in performance, connectivity, or emissions. On top of that, Lenovo has incorporated a very attractive WQHD panel with great colors and contrasts, which could have, at best, been a bit brighter. However, there are good reasons to prefer the Ts over the X1 Carbon. In return for its slightly bigger case, you'll get an even crispier keyboard, additional upgrade and connectivity options native LAN port, SmartCard, SD reader as well as higher performance reserves thank to an increased TDP.

In addition, the price of the Ts is more attractive, yet still very high. All things considered, we would tend to recommend the T series - however, this decision might vary depending on the user. Already the third generation of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon belonged to the slimmest and lightest 14 inch notebooks on the market.

In the fourth generation, Lenovo goes one better and reduces the weight to below 1. We have checked how this affects temperatures, system noise, and performance. Intel Core iU 2 x 2. Lenovo homepage Lenovo notebook section.

Note: The manufacturer may use components from different suppliers including display panels, drives or memory sticks with similar specifications. Size comparison Security Except for the Smartcard reader, the X1 Carbon provides all security features you might expect from a modern business notebook including an extremely fast fingerprint reader mit touch sensor, TPM TCG 1. Warranty Lenovo grants a 3 years warranty with on-site service for its higher priced models - which certainly also include the X1 Carbon - from purchase.

Input Devices. Keyboard Although they look almost the same, the keyboard of the ThinkPad X1 is not exactly the same than the Ts '. Touchpad The touchpad from Synaptics also has been especially designed for the X1 Carbon. Touchpad and trackpoint. Subpixel grid. Grayscales before calibration. Color fidelity before calibration. Color saturation before calibration. Grayscales after calibration. Color fidelity after calibration. Color saturation after calibration. Maximum Turbo clock rate: 3.

CB R15 Single. CB R15 Multi start. CB R15 Multi end. Cinebench R15 Cinebench R Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit. Storage Device. AS-SSD benchmark. HD Tune. Transfer Rate Minimum: Transfer Rate Maximum: Transfer Rate Average: Access Time: 0. Burst Rate: CPU Usage: 1.

CrystalDiskMark 3. Sequential Read: Sequential Write: AS SSD. Access Time Read: 0. Access Time Write: 0. Copy ISO: Copy Program: Copy Game: Score Read: Points. Score Write: Points. Score Total: Points. System Performance. PCMark 7 Score. Graphics Card. Hardware accelerated HEVC playback. Gaming Performance. System Noise. Frequency characteristic of the fan idle, full load. Noise Level Idle. Stress test. Power Supply max. Frequency characteristics of the speakers off, half volume, maximum volume.

Energy Management. Power Consumption. Key: min: , med: , max: Metrahit Energy Currently we use the Metrahit Energy, a professional single phase power quality and energy measurement digital multimeter, for our measurements. Find out more about it here.

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